Head-to-Head: Stitches React vs Windi CSS Analysis

@stitches/react

v1.2.8(almost 2 years ago)

This package was last published over a year ago. It may not be actively maintained.Types definitions are bundled with the npm packageNumber of direct dependencies: 0Monthly npm downloads

@stitches/react is a CSS-in-JS library that provides a seamless way to write and manage styles in React applications. It offers a powerful and intuitive API for defining styles using JavaScript, allowing you to leverage the full power of JavaScript while writing CSS. With @stitches/react, you can easily create reusable style components, apply dynamic styles based on props or state, and use responsive styles for different screen sizes.

Alternatives:
emotion+
styled-components+
goober+
twin.macro+
linaria+
styletron-react+
astroturf+
vanilla-extract+
jss+
glamor+

Tags: javascriptcss-in-jsreactstylingperformance

windicss

v3.5.6(over 1 year ago)

This package was last published over a year ago. It may not be actively maintained.Types definitions are bundled with the npm packageNumber of direct dependencies: 0Monthly npm downloads

WindiCSS is a utility-first CSS framework for rapid UI development. It aims to provide a lightweight and efficient solution for styling web applications. With WindiCSS, you can write your styles directly in your HTML templates using utility classes, eliminating the need for writing custom CSS stylesheets.

Alternatives:
tailwindcss+
tachyons+
bootstrap+
bulma+
foundation-sites+
semantic-ui-css+
skeleton+
uikit+
primer-css+
materialize-css+

Tags: cssframeworkutility-firstrapid-developmentbundle-sizeperformance

Fight!

Popularity

Both @stitches/react and WindiCSS are popular choices in the frontend development community. However, WindiCSS has gained significant popularity in recent years due to its focus on utility-first CSS and its integration with popular frontend frameworks like Vue and React.

CSS-in-JS vs Utility-first CSS

@stitches/react is a CSS-in-JS library that allows you to write CSS styles directly in your JavaScript code. It provides a powerful and expressive API for styling React components. On the other hand, WindiCSS is a utility-first CSS framework that focuses on providing a set of utility classes that you can use to style your HTML elements. It follows a different approach to styling compared to CSS-in-JS libraries like @stitches/react.

Developer Experience

@stitches/react provides a seamless developer experience with its intuitive API and strong typing support. It integrates well with TypeScript and provides a great developer experience for styling React components. WindiCSS, on the other hand, offers a different developer experience with its utility-first approach. It provides a large set of utility classes that you can use directly in your HTML markup, which can be convenient for rapid prototyping and quick styling.

Performance

In terms of performance, @stitches/react is known for its efficient runtime and minimal bundle size. It generates optimized CSS at build time, resulting in faster rendering and smaller bundle sizes. WindiCSS also focuses on performance and aims to generate minimal and optimized CSS. However, the utility-first approach of WindiCSS can sometimes result in larger CSS files compared to @stitches/react.

Integration and Ecosystem

Both @stitches/react and WindiCSS can be easily integrated into existing projects. @stitches/react works well with React and provides a seamless integration with other popular React libraries and tools. WindiCSS, on the other hand, can be used with any frontend framework or vanilla HTML projects. It has integrations with popular frontend frameworks like Vue and React, as well as build tools like webpack and Vite.

Customization and Extensibility

@stitches/react provides a highly customizable and extensible API, allowing you to define your own design tokens and create reusable styles. It offers a lot of flexibility in terms of theming and customization. WindiCSS, on the other hand, provides a set of utility classes that can be customized using configuration files. While it may not offer the same level of customization as @stitches/react, it provides a good balance between convenience and flexibility.